The Books I Bought in St. Louis

books bought in St. Louis 010

When you visit antique shops looking for buttons, which I did in St.
Louis, you’re bound to trip across some books even when that’s not
your search object.

I found a strange assortment you might think.  The little magazines
are for my grandchildren (and me).  When I was growing up, I loved
reading “Jack and Jill” magazine.  That, and Wee Wisdom, were
welcome arrivals in the mail.  When I was little I once submitted a
story to Jack and Jill, but it wasn’t accepted (imagine!)   These issues
are dated 1951-1955.

There was always an easy-read favorite page with:

from Jack and Jill magazine

from Jack and Jill magazine

(click to enlarge)

and a lot of stories and puzzles and riddles.  Usually, almost always,
one of the stories was a “foreign” story, taking place in some exotic
country.  I ignored those.  Sometimes the stories were continued in
the next issue—hard to wait a whole month to find out the ending.

Two of these little magazines have a play written out and I think my
granddaughters will enjoy taking parts and pretending.

I laughed when I saw that for activities, there was a GIRLS page and
a BOYS page:

from Jack and Jill magazine

from Jack and Jill magazine

The girls were to make a “silver chain” from aluminum foil; “spool shakers”
from empty thread spools; and “button poppets” from buttons and pipe
cleaners.

The boys, in the meantime, got to do a “trick with light”; make an “indoor
garden”; and a “paper-plate snake.”

Well, anyway, for the real books, I bought a clean as a whistle Heritage Club
collector edition of David Copperfield in a slipcase.  The illustrator is John
Austen.  I don’t care for the illustrations—is this how you picture David
and Dora?

illustration by John Austen in David Copperfield.

illustration by John Austen in David Copperfield.

But I agree with the publisher that the pages are nice in these editions:
lightweight and creamy and pleasant on the eye . . .

And “Pipefuls” by Christopher Morley.  This is a collection of short pieces
written when he had a column for The New York Evening Post and the Philadelphia
Evening Public Ledger.  This illustrator is Walt Jack Duncan.  Printed in 1920.
Maybe a first edition.  Morley is kind of fun to read, and there’s a large section
where he compares “two cities”—-that is, New York and Philadelphia.

illustration by Walter Jack Duncan for Pipefuls by Christopher Morley

illustration by Walter Jack Duncan for Pipefuls by Christopher Morley

You probably are guessing that I’ll read “X-Man” first, but that’s a
surprise for my grandson.

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