The Art Scene in Glasgow

If I lived in Glasgow, I’d gather whatever grandchildren were
available and go to the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum  every
Saturday.  One could easily spend the day there, including having
lunch at the well-stocked serve yourself café.  It’s not just paintings
either—there are stuffed animal exhibits–natural history displays,
daily concerts, etc.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow

 

 

 

 

another view--it's huge! Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow

another view–it’s huge!
Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We admired the gardens and then ascended the wide steps to the
music of a piano—which we saw outside on the stone entryway
and some teenagers were playing it gleefully.

This was our introduction to Charles Rennie Mackintosh and
there is a generous display of his furniture and design plans.  I know
you’ve seen and heard about him on the Antiques Road Show.

And one room had early fashions—-do I see embroidered buttons!!

early fashions at Kelvingrove Museum--embroidered vest with embroidered buttons ©booksandbuttons

early fashions at Kelvingrove Museum–embroidered vest with embroidered buttons ©booksandbuttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But even better than that, (if that is
possible!) was the introduction to the “Glasgow Boys”.
This was a group of men, artists, about 20 of them, who worked in the
early days of Glasgow setting forth a new way of painting.

 

Some of the Glasgow Boys---early artists making Scottish history in the arts

Some of the Glasgow Boys—early artists making Scottish history in the arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course it won’t do YOU any good to “touch the photo” because
this is just a photo of the museum placard.  I’m not that savvy to
transfer the technology!

This was my favorite painting by a Glasgow Boy  –by John Lavery
–isn’t it beautiful?

"The Maidenhead Regatta" 19  by John Lavery at the Kelvingrove in Glasgow ©booksandbuttons

“The Maidenhead Regatta” 19 by John Lavery at the Kelvingrove in Glasgow ©booksandbuttons CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

 

 

 

placard for John Lavery at Kelvingrove Glasgow

placard for John Lavery at Kelvingrove Glasgow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is what we had wanted—to know Scottish artists better.  We
could have spent the whole day studying those paintings.  We did
spend hours there—for there was plenty to see on three levels.  And
MacHalf bought the museum catalog about the Glasgow Boys.

Another favorite of mine was this offbeat modern painting–the artist is
recalling the day his mother’s display cabinet fell over and most of
the best dishes were smashed.  The frame is separated and the painting
skewed—you can feel how upset everyone must have been.  I like
paintings that I’ll remember a while!

"Embassy Lodge" 1990 by Anthony Green--large--about 4 ft x 4 ft.  At Kelvingrove Gallery Glasgow

“Embassy Lodge” 1990 by Anthony Green–large–about 4 ft x 4 ft. At Kelvingrove Gallery Glasgow ©booksandbuttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a different day we went to the GoMA–The Glasgow Gallery of
Modern Art.  This grand building is blessed with a huge statue of
guess who!—-The Duke of Wellington!—I told you he’s everywhere!

This statue sports a traffic cone.  According to the Hop On/Hop Off
–see Glasgow!–tour guide, the police keep removing the traffic cone,
but the “youngsters” of Glasgow replace it every night.  Ho-ho-ho.

statue of the Duke of Wellington in front of the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow©booksandbuttons

statue of the Duke of Wellington in front of the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow©booksandbuttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I won’t keep you much longer here.  But let me mention two
exhibits–first that of Moyna Flannigan . . .you won’t like her, and
I don’t know if I like her, but her work is striking:

in the She series by Moyna Flannigan at the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow ©booksandbuttons

in the She series by Moyna Flannigan at the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow ©booksandbuttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But best, best, best of all, was going up another level, walking
down the hall and entering this room:  (click to enlarge)

"The Lamp of Sacrifice, 286 Places of Worship, Edinburgh 2004" by Nathan Coley GoMA ©booksandbuttons

“The Lamp of Sacrifice, 286 Places of Worship, Edinburgh 2004” by Nathan Coley GoMA ©booksandbuttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathan Coley made all of these churches from cardboard
stock—each church selected as being listed in the 2004  yellow
pages telephone directory in Edinburgh.   I love innovative art
like this.  I love it.

 

 

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4 Responses to The Art Scene in Glasgow

  1. Booksilver says:

    The Anthony Green reminds me of Thurber’s wonderful essay, what is it called, “The Night the Bed Fell”?

    • booksandbuttons says:

      It’s not only a striking painting to look at,
      but I like the way the frame is all broken, too.
      Did Thurber make a drawing? I’ll have to check!

  2. FictionFan says:

    Going to school just round the corner from the Kelvingrove Art Gallery, we got taken there about a million times – always something new to see. Glad you enjoyed it!

    • booksandbuttons says:

      Oh, I love knowing that! What a wonderful story. The day
      we were there, about 200 folding chairs had been set up for
      a recital at 1:30. Nice to think about.

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